Anzac Commemorative Medallion

ANZAC in case

This bronze medallion was instituted in 1967 for award to Australian and New Zealand personnel who participated in the Gallipoli campaign in 1915. ANZAC 1The main design on the obverse of the medallion depicts Simpson and his donkey carrying a wounded soldier, an iconic image of the ANZAC experience at Gallipoli.

man-with-the-donkeyNZ

It was based on a watercolour by 4/26A Sapper H. Moore-Jones, NZ Engineers, who fought on the ridges above Anzac Cove until overcome with exhaustion. He was later re-employed as an artist and made numerous sketches of the men and actions in and around the Gallipoli Peninsula. Sapper. Moore-Jones based his paintings upon a photograph of Pte. Richard (Dick) Henderson and a donkey.

R Henderson

Richard Henderson

 

Private John Simpson Kirkpatrick (born 6 July 1892, died 19 May 1915), better known as ‘Simpson’ or ‘the man with the donkey’, was assigned to the 3rd Field Ambulance, Australian Army Medical Corps. He was among the covering force which landed on Gallipoli at dawn on 25 April 1915.  At Gallipoli he used a donkey (named ‘Abdul’, ‘Murphy’ or ‘Duffy’) to carry wounded soldiers to the dressing station and gained a reputation for being undaunted by enemy fire.

Simpson_and_the_donkey

John Simpson Kirkpatrick

 

On 19 May 1915 he was killed. The myth-making began almost immediately after his death, and he soon became one of the best-known images of the ANZAC experience. The task of evacuating wounded by donkey was then continued by a New Zealander, Pte. R.A. Henderson.

Below the main design is a wreath of gum leaves (Australian Eucalyptus), below which is a scroll bearing the word “ANZAC” (Australian New Zealand Army Corps). ANZAC BckThe circular portion of the reverse has a map of Australia and New Zealand with the Southern Cross. Beneath which is a wreath of fern leaves (representing New Zealand) and a blank scroll allowing for the inclusion of the recipient’s name. The medallion measures 76mm x 50mm, and is engraved on the reverse with the recipient’s initials and surname only. Because of insufficient space on the scroll, the rank and number had to be omitted. Originally all NZ medallions were engraved at the Royal NZ Electrical Mechanical Engineers (RNZEME) workshop at Trentham Military camp, they are still engraved in Trentham but not by the RNZEME, it’s now done by civilians of Personnel Archives and Medals section NZDF.

The design of the medallion was the work of Raymond Boultwood Ewers, a well known artist and Australian War Memorial sculptor.

The medallion itself is not designed to be worn, however, those personnel who were still alive when the medallion was issued also received a lapel badge sized version of the full medallion, numbered on the reverse with the individual’s First World War service number. Those who claimed the award on behalf of a deceased relative received only the medallion.  The medallion was issued with a certificate.  ANZAC cert The medallion is sometimes referred to as the Gallipoli Medallion.

The idea of officially awarding something that commemorates the service at Gallipoli of the Anzac troops seems to have been a contentious and drawn out matter.

As early as 1917 Lieutenant General Birdwood was suggesting the idea that a medal the “Gallipoli Star” (originally to be called the ANZAC Star) should be awarded to members of the Australian Imperial Force and 1NZEF who served at Gallipoli. The medal and ribbon were designed by Warrant Officer, R.K. Peacock of Defence Headquarters, Melbourne. King George V approved the design for the Gallipoli Star medal and ribbon to be awarded to “…all Dominion officers and soldiers of the Australian, New Zealand and Newfoundland military forces who actually served with an Expeditionary Force provided that they landed on the Gallipoli peninsula prior to the evacuation thereof”.

However, by August 1918 when the design of the star and the conditions for award had been finalised, and stocks of ribbon forwarded to New Zealand and Australia (according to a document in the Australian War Memorial, “thousands of meters of ribbon were woven”, and was ready for issue), the proposal was reviewed by the British government following criticism from both members of Parliament and the media in the United Kingdom, who were uneasy about British and other forces of the Empire being ineligible for the proposed star. After consultation with the Australian and New Zealand governments, the British War Cabinet agreed that the 1914-15 Star would be awarded to all personnel who had served at Gallipoli.

Since 1918, notably in 1949-50, and in the period 1962-66, efforts have been made, through parliamentary representations, to have the Gallipoli Star awarded. The United Kingdom Committee on the Grant of Honours, Decorations and Medals ‘expressed strong objections to any special form of recognition which would indicate discriminatory treatment in favour of any individual contingent participating in the Gallipoli campaign.” Eventually, in October 1965, after rejecting the idea of producing an Army emblem with the “A” on it for veterans to wear, the idea of a medallion and lapel badge was favoured by members of the Australian Defence Committee. From March 1967 the Anzac Commemorative Medallion began to be issued, however this was not the end of the story of the “Gallipoli Star”.

Gallipoli Star

In 1990 Mr Ross Smith, of Canberra a former Australian Army Warrant Officer and Vietnam veteran, arranged, at his own expense, for dies from the original design to be manufactured and for AJ Parkes & Co Pty Ltd, of Brisbane to strike 1000 examples of the medal. Two hundred of these medals were personally presented by Mr Smith to Australian (150) and NZ (50) Gallipoli veterans. The remaining stars were made available to the public through Suttle Medals of Sydney. After the initial striking of the 1000 stars, the dies were donated to the Australian War Museum in Canberra; however due to high interest in the medal, Suttle Medals subsequently secured a second and final striking of three hundred medals. These second strike stars are marked on the back with “COLLECTOR’S/ITEM”.

Even after all this time the Gallipoli Star remains a private award, without official approval.

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Anzac day 2017

That time of the year (25 April) when New Zealand and Australia remembers and celebrates the service of our men and women of the Army, Navy & Air Force (see link to Anzac day 2016 Anzac day 2016).

Today is the 101st Anzac day and it seems to be gaining in importance for both countries each year. Even in my small home town (population of about 13,000 people) there were about 100 people present at this mornings dawn service at the war memorial. For myself I look on this time to not only acknowledge the service and sacrifice of New Zealanders but remember the sacrifices of all service people and thank them all for their service. So if you are reading this and are a former service person or you are currently serving, thank you for your service and sacrifice.

Thought I would show a few of my Anzac related items, which you will hopefully find interesting.

Starting with perhaps my smallest item.Anzac day ftThis small tie pin is nine carat gold and is made up of both NZ and Australian iconography. Topped by the kings crown the central image of the Australian sunburst Image (used on the army’s universal cap/collar badge) and NZ Moa bird (could also be an Australian Emu) is surrounded by the NZ silver fern and is finished off with the base scroll with “ANZAC” engraved on it.

The back of this nice little tie pin that would have been worn by a proud former Gallipoli veteran.Anzac day bck

These three World War One medals were issued to a NZ serviceman who had served and survived the Gallipoli Campaign.Anzac day medalsThe medals are (from left to right) the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal & Victory Medal (also known as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred).

The impressing on the rim of the BWM and Victory and back of the 1914-15 Star, show they were awarded to 10/1245 Sergeant E. GRANT, New Zealand Expeditionary Force.Anzac day medals name

10/1245 Ernest GRANT landed on the Gallipoli Peninsular on the 25 April 1915 with the Wellington Infantry Battalion. After serving in the 7th Wellington West Coast Regiment from the landing for just over 4 months, he was attached to the Brigade Headquarters as a cook. Like many who served on the peninsula, his health suffered and in October he was evacuated off Gallipoli to Number 2, Australian General Hospital, Mudros with diarrhea. In January 1916 he left the island of Lemnos being evacuated to Cairo on the Australian hospital ship Asturias. After a period of recuperation in Egypt and training and instruction in the United Kingdom he then went on to serve with the 2nd Battalion, Wellington Infantry Regiment, in France. He survived the war and even went on to serve at home in the Second World War. He passed away in Nelson, New Zealand in May 1956.

My last item was for a New Zealander who did not make it back home from Gallipoli being killed there on the 3 May 1915.

I have a strong interest in collecting both the official and un-official ways of commemorating New Zealand’s war dead and this particular piece is one of my favourites.Anzac day memAnzac day mem clse

Murcott

Stanley MURCOTT was from Otago in the South Island of New Zealand and enlisted for service in the 1st NZ Expeditionary Force on the 26 August 1914. He landed on ANZAC cove on the 25 April 1915 with the 4th Otago Company, Otago Infantry Battalion. The 2nd to 3rd of May 1915 was a bad time for the Otago Battalion. They were assigned to launch an attack up Monash Gully in an attempt to help Godley’s New Zealand & Australian Division seize Baby 700. The attack on the 2nd May began badly with the Otago’s arriving one and a half hours late at the jump off point because of unfamiliarity with the terrain, the weather and descending darkness. The attack was a total failure: no ground was gained, and there were about 800 casualties. The Otago’s lost about half their strength as killed, wounded and missing. During the morning of 3 May the remnants of the Otago Infantry Battalion mustered on the beach over half the men were absent from the roll call. Of the 4th Otago’s alone, only 57 out of about 200 answered the roll call.

Stanley’s name, along with others from the district, on the Hampden War memorial.Hampden War Memorial

 

 

Royal New Zealand Navy, Rear Admiral’s Uniform

Chief NavyOf the three services the Navy is a bit of red headed stepchild in my collection. However, I do have this uniform though and it is a pretty good one since it was once worn by a Chief of the New Zealand Navy.

Chief of Navy (CN) commands the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) and is responsible to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) for raising, training and sustaining those forces necessary to meet agreed government outputs. The CN acts as principal advisor to the CDF on Navy matters, and is the most senior appointment in the RNZN. The rank associated with the position is rear admiral, and CNs are generally appointed on a three-year term.

The position was originally created as Chief of Naval Staff and First Naval Member upon the formation of the RNZN on 1 October 1941. The title changed to Chief of Naval Staff in 1970, and CN in 2003

A close up of the rank braid for Rear Admiral.Chief Navy rank braid

The ribbons are (from L to R); New Zealand Order of Merit (Officer), Royal Victorian Order (Member), New Zealand Operational Service Medal, New Zealand General Service Medal (non-warlike), New Zealand Armed Forces Award with Rosette.

Chief Navy ribbons

The Order of New Zealand Merit

NZ order of MeritInstituted in 1996, the New Zealand Order of Merit has five levels: Knight or Dame Grand Companion (GNZM), Knight or Dame Companion (KNZM / DNZM), Companion (CNZM), Officer (ONZM) and Member (MNZM). Appointments to the New Zealand Order of Merit are made for meritorious service to the Crown or the nation and to those who have become distinguished in their particular field of endeavour. The number of living Knight or Dame Grand Companions at any one time is restricted to 30. Appointments to the remaining four levels are limited to 15 Knight or Dame Companions, 40 Companions, 80 Officers and 140 Members per year.

The Royal Victorian Order

Royal_Victorian_Order_UK_ribbonMembership in the Royal Victorian Order is conferred by the reigning monarch without ministerial advice on those who have performed personal service for the sovereign, any member of his or her family, or any of his or her viceroys. All living citizens of any Commonwealth realm, including women since 1936, are eligible for any of the five levels of the order (Member, Lieutenant, Commander, Knight/Dame Commander, Knight/Dame Grand Cross).

The NZ Operational Service Medal

NZOSMThe New Zealand Operational Service Medal (NZOSM) was instituted in 2002 for award to New Zealanders who have undertaken operational service since 3 September 1945. The start date is the day after the surrender ceremony in Tokyo Bay, and is also the day after qualifying service towards medals for Second World War service ended. The NZOSM provides specific New Zealand recognition for operational service, and is awarded in addition to any New Zealand, Commonwealth or foreign campaign medal. It is awarded once only to an individual, regardless of how many times he or she has deployed on operations. Operational service is service which exceeds the normal requirements of peacetime service, and which involves a credible military threat from enemy military forces, insurgents, or other hostile forces.

The NZ General Service Medal (non-warlike)

NZGSMThe New Zealand General Service Medal 1992 was instituted in 1992. It was issued in bronze to recognise service in non-warlike operations for which no separate New Zealand, British Commonwealth, United Nations or NATO campaign medal was issued. Thirteen clasps have been issued for non-warlike (peacekeeping) operations since 1954 in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and the Pacific.

The NZ Armed Forces Award

NZAFAThe New Zealand Armed Forces Award was instituted on 6 May 1985, for award to Regular Force officers of the New Zealand military who have completed fifteen years unblemished service. Clasps are awarded for each additional fifteen years unblemished service. On the ribbon bar the addition of a clasp is signified with the addition of a rosette to the ribbon.

Above the ribbon bar is the trade badge for Principle Warfare Officer. Their job is to “drive and command the warships”. They are responsible for the safe passage and navigation of the ship at sea and manage the bridge staff and ship routines while on watch. The two piece badge has a gilt front profile of a ship topped with the queens crown and crossed with a sword and taiaha. The taiaha is a traditional Maori weapon which has a spear point at one end and a flat paddle shaped blade at the other. The second silver piece is a representation of two silver fern fronds and serves as the backing with the clutch back pins on the back.

rear Admiral

The Chief of Navy who wore this uniform joined the NZ Navy as a sub-lieutenant in 1980 and During his naval career served aboard the ships HMNZS Taranaki, HMNZS Canterbury and HMNZS Wellington. While on exchange to Australia for two years he also served onboard the HMAS Watson, HMAS Adelaide, and HMAS Parramatta. He also served as the commanding officer of HMNZS Pukaki, HMNZS Waikato and HMNZS Te Mana.

 

WW 2 NZ Memorial Cards

These un-official cards were a families way of thanking an individual for sending their sympathy on the loss of a loved one. Many had photos of the dead serviceman which would also serve as a remembrance to those who had received them.

I try and pick these up when ever I can find them whatever the condition. Have managed to do a little bit or research on a few of these cards to try and find out about the serviceman and the circumstances of their death.

This memorial card was sent by Karl and Johanna Hultenberg who’s son Guy had been killed on the 17 April 1945. G Hultenburg 2This card came in the original mourning envelope.G HultenburgAlso in the envelope was a small picture of Guy which had some writing on the back. The photo shows him dressed in the early high collar service dress with the wide 1908 pattern web belt. The writing on the back is rather touching, complete with possible tear stains. It says ” Guy as a small boy. Sorry I made a mistake I mean as a tall proud smiling soldier”.

From the official history of the 27th Machine Gun Battalion I have found out that on the 17th April the 27th Battalion were involved in capturing the village Villa Fontana in Italy. After successfully capturing the village the battalion then planned to advance over the Gaiana however after some stiff German resistance involving Tiger tanks and troops of the 1st Parachute Division, a stalemate developed. The Germans were pretty well dug in on one of the stopbanks of a tributary of the Gaiana. The second company of the 27th, Guy’s company, was the most forward of the 27th companies and had been able to secure the opposite stopbank. The second company had suffered casualties due to snipers from across the other stopbank, so the Officer Commanding (OC) broke the company up into two groups and with one group, the group Guy was in, occupied a house which commanded the banks on both sides of the canal for some distance, from the upper windows of the house, the OC and two or three others retaliated against the German snipers. From this advantage point Guy Hultenberg was able to use his Bren gun as a snipping weapon and account for 5 Germans before he was killed. The official history notes that his OC “…cautioned him on several occasions to be more careful but unfortunately his enthusiasm and courage overcame  his judgment”.

   Hultenburg

Here’s a bit more info on Guy from the CWGC:

Name: HULTENBERG, GUY
Nationality: New Zealand
Rank: Private
Regiment: New Zealand Machine Gun Battalion Unit Text: 27th
Age: 24
Date of Death: 17/04/1945
Service No: 244897
Additional information: Son of Karl Folke Hultenberg and of Johanna Hultenberg (nee Andersen), of Carterton, Wellington, New Zealand.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead Grave/Memorial Reference: VI. G. 15.
Cemetery: FAENZA WAR CEMETERY

Another photo of Guy from the Auckland War Memorial Museum, Cenotaph website.Hultenburg 2

This memorial card was sent by Louisa Durward who’s son was an RNZAF wireless operator/ air gunner and was killed on 21 Jan 1943.


Flight Sergeant James Sydney Durward, RNZAF 412872, 101 Sqn(RAF), who died age 26 on 21 January 1943, and is buried in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery 3.B.16.

Flight Sergeant Durward was a crew member of a Lancaster IB (built at Avro Chadderton) serial number ED443 code SR-B . This aircraft was delivered to 101 Squadron on 30 December 1942 and completed 28 hours with the squadron before it was lost on the night of the 21/22-01-1943. SR-B took off at 17:00 from Holme-on Spalding-Moor (Yorkshire) on a bombing mission to Essen (site of the Krups factory). The crew was:

Pilot Sgt: PTW Wiltshire (age21) RNZAF 413165 KIA
Engineer: Sgt J Carr (22) RAAF 10169 KIA
Navigator: FO KE Kibble (22) RNZAF 41336 KIA
Bomb Aimer: Sgt GJ Smale (22) RAFVR 1377300 KIA
Wireless Operator/Air Gunner: FSgt JS Durward (26) RNZAF 412872 KIA
Mid Upper Gunner: Sgt EJ Chapman (?) RAFVR 1322050 KIA
Rear Gunner: Sgt MI Sharpley (22) RAFVR 964253 KIA

The aircraft Durward was a crew member of crashed near Dortmund where the crew were initially buried in the Hauptfriedhof. Since reinterred at the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery.

Durward 1
The bombing mission to Essen (up until early 1943 the most bombed town) involved 79 Lancaster and 3 Mosquito (probably from 109 pathfinder Sqn) aircraft. The bombers encountered total cloud cover and bombs were dropped blindly on estimated positions. Four Lancaster’s were lost. None of the crews of the 4 bombers survived.
The other Lancaster’s that were lost were:

PM-A (103 Squadron) serial # W4340. Built between July-Nov 1942 at Avro Chadderton. Delivered to 103 Sqn Oct 1942 completed 95 hours with the squadron. Took off from Elsham Woods at 1735. Pilot P/O Edgar Heaton RAF 51898. The aircraft was lost without trace (probably in the North Sea). I believe PM-A was shot down by Uffz Georg Kraft of 12/NJG1 (shot down at approx 19:52 from 5600m). It was the bomber crews second operation. The crew are commemorated on the RAF Memorial at Runnymede.

PM-F (103 Sqn) serial# W4335. Took off from Elsham Woods at 1743. Pilot Sgt Edward Vivian Laing (age 22) RAAF 406693. The aircraft was shot down on its outward trip by Feldwebel Theodor Klein-Henz of 3/NJG1at 19:30 the plane crashed 10 miles from Enschede (Holland). The crew were all buried in Enschede Eastern General Cemetery.

EM-B (207 Sqn) serial# W4365. Built between July-Nov 1942 at Avro Chadderton. Took off from Langar at 17:29. Pilot Sgt John Charles Dangerfield (age 28) RAAF 407965. The crew are all buried in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery.

 

 

Air Force Silver Fern Badge

The Evening Post newspaper in an article, dated 24 April 1942, about 75 (NZ) Squadron noted that “In every aircraft the crews wear the silver fern badge. Many of the men regard it as a mascot and would not dream of flying without it. The English members of the crew, especially, the sergeants, also proudly wear the badge.”

There are a few photographs of Aircrew wearing this un-official badge a few of which I will show below. It is interesting to note that the photographs below are not of members of 75 Sqn so it appears this was wider worn than just with that particular squadron.

Here is my example of the badge.

silver-fern-bck-pin

You will note that on the back of the badge it is marked J.R. GAUNT, London. The firm of J.R. Gaunt & Son was established in 1884 when John Richard Gaunt and his eldest son, Charles Frederick, left their employment with the long established London military button makers Firmin & Sons to set up on their own. The firm, originally based at the intersection of Clifford Street and Furnace Lane in the Birmingham district of Lozells, prospered and began to supply badges and buttons to uniformed organisations all over the World.  After the First World War they purchased a number of other insignia manufacturers, including in 1924 Jennens & Co Ltd. With the acquisition of the Jennens business Gaunts moved their London base to Warwick Street. In 1991 Gaunt became a part of the Firmin Group.

Reference https://www.dnw.co.uk/auction-archive/special-collections/foreword.php?specialcollection_id=104

http://collectionsonline.nmsi.ac.uk/detail.php?type=related&kv=18946&t=people

 

 

 

9th Brigade Battle Dress

9th-brigade-lt-sideIn late January 1945 an increased need for infantry forced 2NZ Division to form another Brigade. 9NZ Brigade was formed when troops from the Divisional Cavalry, 27th Machine Gun Battalion and 22nd (Motorized) Battalion had been converted to a purely infantry role and brought together to create the new battalion.

9th-brigade-lt-ft-2

This particular Battle Dress blouse was worn by 71123 Lieutenant Allen Stanley ROGERS. The two ribbons are for the 1939-45 Star and Italy Star.

On the right forearm he has five Service Chevrons, each chevron equals 1 year of completed service.

9th-brigade-lt-service-stripes

And on his left sleeve he has two Wound Stripes (find out more about Wound Stripes).

9th-brigade-lt-wound-stripes

Lieutenant ROGERS was first wounded by a grenade fragment on the 29 October 1943 while he was a part of the  36th Battalion, serving in the Pacific with the 3rd NZ Division. He was wounded again, this time in Italy, on the 15 April 1945 when he was with the 22nd Battalion and was hit by the blast of a mortar round while bringing back five German POW’s to Battalion Head Quarters. Two New Zealanders were wounded and two Germans killed by the blast.

 

Wound Stripes

0aed97311981f5ebc0a5847d769f631f

photo from photo detective.co.uk

WW One Wound Stripes

In August 1916 Army orders approved a distinction to be worn by all officers and soldiers who had been declared wounded in casualty lists in any campaign since 4 August 1914. These were strips of gold Russia braid No.1, two inches in length, sewn perpendicularly on the lower left sleeve of the jacket, to mark each occasion wounded. Soldiers found that the Russia braid tarnished and was hard to clean. In view of the difficulties a number of companies produced brass versions, which where easy to remove and polish. For each additional wound another strip was placed on either  original at 1/2 inch intervals. Officers and soldiers reported “Wounded-gas, Wounded-Shock, shell” were entitled to the distinction but accidental or self-inflicted wounds or injuries did not qualify.

As there were a few companies that produced the Brass version of the Wound Stripe there are quite a few varieties. Here are my ones…

This particular example is made by Lambourne’s of Birmingham (the “L” has been obscured by the solder). Lambourne’s had a long history of selling accessories and jewelry for men. Started by Barrett Lambourne in 1886 the company remained under the families ownership until 1981. The company is still in business today though the name was changed in 2004 to Mag Mouch.

My second Stripe is marked rater interestingly on both the backing plate and stripe itself. It says… ‘Service’ Wounded Stripe, SS Ltd – B No 4 Prov Patwound-stripe-2-bck-clseI am not sure who the company SS ltd are but perhaps they are another Birmingham company.

This particular wound stripe was issued to Alexander Thomas Ernest McCRORIEwound-stripe-2-id-disksWho received his wound on the 12 October 1917 while he was a member of 5th Company, NZ Machine Gun Corps. He was sent back to the United Kingdom to recuperate in hospital on the 15 October 1917 and remained there until he embarked to return to NZ on the 28 July 1919. Just prior to the end of WW1 he transferred from the Machine Gun Corps to the NZ Engineers on 4 November 1918.

WW Two Wound Stripes

ww2-wound-stripe

From aucklandmuseum-cenotaph (G COTTON-STAPLETON)

The wearing of Wound Stripes was approved for all ranks of the 2nd NZ Expeditionary Force with the publishing of 2NZEF Order 120/1944. The Wound Stripes were to be narrow gold braid 1.5 inches in length. One stripe will be worn in respect of each occasion on which the serviceman was wounded. The Stripe was to be worn vertically on the left sleeve, the lower end 4 inches above the bottom of the cuff. Interestingly a single red rayon braid stripe worn in the same place indicated a WW1 wound.

Only actual wounds qualified, accidental injuries, neurosis or physical exhaustion cases, even when recorded as battle casualties, did not qualify for the stripe.

The wound stripe was worn on the Service Dress and Battle Dress uniforms but not on the tropical Khaki Drill.

Here is my example of the wound stripe on a Service Dress Uniform.2nd-nzef-jacket-trousers-wound-stripe

I do not know who the serviceman was but you can see the full Service Dress by going here (2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force Figures).

Here is an example of two wound stripes worn on the sleeve of the Battle Dress of a  Lieutenant from the 9th Brigade. He was first wounded by grenade fragments in the Pacific while with the 36th Battalion, his second wound was in Italy with the 22nd Battalion when he was wounded by a mortar blast while he and some other men were bringing 5 German prisoners back to the battalion HQ.9th-brigade-lt-wound-stripesThe wound stripe was not approved for wounds received after WW2 and is still not approved for wear in the NZ Defence Force. In the 1990’s Canada did approve the wearing for post WW2 wounds but that changed in 2008 with the introduction of the Sacrifice Medal.

Reference – M THOMAS & C LORD “NZ Army Distinguishing Patches 1911-1991 ” part one.